Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Best of this blog 2016

It’s the holiday season and therefore time for the unavoidable ‘best of’ lists. Same deal here at the Demassed blog. In this year of virulent hacks, ransomware, digital ad fraud, and an epidemic of fake news, there were still other stories significance in the digital universe, and this post is dedicated to the Top 5 most clicked on stories on this blog in 2016.

The top two posts were on blockchain, a decentralized ledger of digital transactions that “brings security structures and incentives in line with the way we share information in the 21st century.”

One of the posts was about the vision for a new foundation of the music industry, based on direct artist to fan communication and payment, and that story can be found here.

The other blockchain post was about the great cryptocurency hack of 2016, reported to have removed between $50 million and $80 million of funds from the Ethereum blockchain. Read the full post here.

Some of the stolen funds have since been located, and despite the hack and the many unknowns associated with the blockchain it is already in use by several major banks and is forecast to be used by 15% of financial institutions in 2017.

The third most popular post of the year was a series of tweets from a talk given back in January on Marshall McLuhan in the age of social media. I wasn’t able to attend the talk but I was able to follow the discussion by way of the hashtag and captured those nuggets here.


Coming in at number four for the year was on a talk given by media and cultural theorist Douglas Rushkoff who has been thinking about and writing on the social and politic realities brought about the Internet for over 20 years. That post can be read here.



Rounding out the list, at number 5, is a post that looks at one of the most contested topics of life online, and that’s the preponderance of free, or more accurately ‘free’ content, the quotes referencing the fact that very little is ever free, it just appears to be.


What you receive for ‘free’ online is in fact traded for information about you as a consumer, and it’s a transaction all of us partake in dozens of time daily. Could the economy of free be shifting from just the way things are online to being one of a handful of possible business models? This post offers exhibits A, B, C, and D and lets you decide for yourself.

Thanks for reading and sharing the blog this year. I'm now up to 160,000 lifetime views, and even though as much as half of all Internet traffic is reported to be bot-generated, I'm still pretty happy.